Breastfeeding - A Partner's Role

The transition from partner to parent can sometimes be a little difficult, whilst you may be aware of the benefits of breastfeeding you may experience a feeling of being ‘left out’.

However, your support is crucial to the success of breastfeeding. This is a new experience for all of you and may require a little time to adjust to.

10 Tips

1. Discuss your thoughts and feelings about breastfeeding.

2. Try and attend a breastfeeding workshop with your partner so that you can pick up tips and understand techniques.

3. Encourage your partner and reassure her, let her know how proud you are of her and that she is giving your baby a healthy start in life. Don’t forget the health benefits to Mum too.

4. Sit with her when she feeds, check she has got baby well attached. Stroke baby and talk to him/her.

5. Make sure Mum is comfy maybe get her a drink and snack, mums often feel thirsty when they feed.

6. Enjoy time skin to skin with your baby. You do not need to feed your baby to form a close loving bond with them.

7. Spend time with your baby, develop your expertise in settling baby, burping baby, bathing, taking baby out. This all helps build your relationship with your baby and gives mum a chance to relax.

8. Enjoy time together as a new family getting to know each other. Protect her from opinions that may not be helpful. Keep visitors at bay for a while unless they are bringing lunch!

9. Try to maintain the standards at home with the household chores, try to avoid her becoming anxious that the house is a ‘mess’ as she will not be able to relax and feed baby.

10. If you are concerned that breastfeeding will affect your intimate relationship be patient, breastfeeding isn’t going to be forever!

Myth:

"Dad says that feeding my baby is the only way to bond with him/her"

Exploding the Myth:

Not True!

There are lots of ways Dad can bond with baby such as skin to skin, cuddling, bathing and talking to baby. Baby needs to be with their mum for feeding as much as possible.

Breastfeeding information for parents